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Sinful Curiosity is at the Root of Many Sins

Curiosity is one of those qualities of the human person that are double-edged swords. It can cut a path to glory or it can be like a dagger of sin that cuts deep into the soul.

As to its glory, it is one of  the chief ingredients in the capacity of the human person to,  as Scripture says, “subdue the earth,” to gain mastery over the many aspects of creation of which God made us stewards. So much of our ingenuity and innovation is rooted in our wonder and awe of God’s creation, and those two little questions, “How?” and “Why?”

Yes, we are curious as to how things work and why they work as they do. This curiosity burns within us and motivates us to unlock many of nature’s secrets. Curiosity drives us to learn and to gain mastery—often for good, but sometimes for ill.

What a powerful force within us, this thing we call curiosity! It is a passion to know! Generally, it seems quite exclusive to us who are rational, for animals manifest little or none of it. Occasionally an animal might seem to manifest curiosity: a sound might draw its attention causing it to look more closely. But the investigation is probably more motivated by seeing whether the sound is a threat or a food source rather than by curiosity. True curiosity asks the deeper metaphysical questions of what, how, and why. True curiosity seeks to explore formal and final causality as well as efficient and material causality. It seeks to learn, sometimes for learning’s own sake. Sometimes, and potentially more darkly, curiosity seeks to learn so we can exert control.

Of itself, curiosity can be a magnificent quality, rooted in the gifts of wonder and awe as well as in the deeply profound gift of man’s intellect or rational nature.

However, as a double-edged sword, curiosity can also wound us very deeply and mire us in serious sin. Indeed, it can be a very sinful drive within us. Eve grew curious of the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil and thus Satan was easily able to turn her curiosity into a deep dagger that has reached every human heart.

Understood this way (as a sinful drive), curiosity is a desire to gain knowledge of things we have no right to know. A more mitigated form of sinful curiosity is the desire to know things that are in no way useful to us. In this sense, curiosity is a form of spiritual gluttony that exposes us to innumerable tricks of the evil one.

Sinful curiosity causes us to meddle in the lives of others, to pry.  This can then lead us to gossip, potentially defaming others and ruining reputations in the process. Nothing is a bigger invitation to sin and gossip than the phrase “Have you heard the latest news about so-and-so?” Heads turn, ears perk up, and meddlesome curiosity is immediately incited. Almost never is the news that follows such a question positive or even edifying. Sinful curiosity is at the root of almost all gossip, defamation, slander, and even calumny. Ninety percent of what we hear through gossip is none of our business. And yet, through sinful curiosity, somehow we feel that we have the right to this information.

There is a whole branch of news, barely distinguishable from gossip columns and scandal sheets, that has emerged based on the people’s “right to know.”  Too much secrecy can be unhealthy but that is hardly the problem in this day and age. Today, too many people know too many things about too many people. Even what is reported (most of it unnecessary) about so-called public figures is not really helpful for us to know. This is not to say we should have no concerns whatsoever about what is happening in the world or about the character of our leaders; rather, it is an invitation to distinguish between what is truly useful and necessary for us to know and that which is simply rooted in sinful curiosity.

Sinful curiosity is also at the root of a lot of lust and immodesty. A man may be happily married, but when he sees a woman walk past on the sidewalk he may temporarily push that to the back of his mind. Part of his problem is lust.  And in that lustful mindset, he reduces the woman—a person—to her curves and other physical attributes. But another aspect of his struggle, is a sinfully curious question: “I wonder what she’d be like?”  Well, sir, that is none of your business! Now mind you he’s happily married, but he already knows his wife well. Pardon the expression, but the mystery of his wife has been unveiled. This other woman he sees, however, still has a shroud of mystery that incites in him a sinful curiosity. Immodesty also taps into the sinful curiosity of others by revealing more than it should. Modesty is reverence for mystery. Immodesty jettisons this reverence and seeks to incite sinful curiosity.
Sinful curiosity has also been turned into a consumer industry by many talk shows that publicly feature topics that should be discussed discreetly. Further, many guests on such shows reveal details about their life that should not be discussed in a public forum. Too many people discuss terrible struggles of a very personal nature and too many people tune in to listen. This is a form of immodesty as well, even if it does not involve sexual matters, for modesty is reverence for mystery and respects appropriate boundaries and degrees of intimacy in conversations. “Baring one’s soul” is neither prudent nor appropriate in all situations with all people and it too easily excites sinful curiosity and sets loose a wave of gossip and uncharitable banter of all sorts. Some things are just not meant to be dealt with in public, and many are incapable of handling such information without easily straying into sin.

A mitigated form of sinful curiosity is the excessive desire to know too many things all at once. This is a kind of “information gluttony.” This sort of desire, though not necessarily sinful, can become so by excess. It is catered to by the 24-by-7 news services. Being informed is good, but being over-informed can easily lead to becoming overwhelmed and discouraged.  Generally speaking, indulging in such a steady stream of news (along with talk radio, etc.) incites a great deal of anxiety, discouragement, and a sense of being overwhelmed. Such news services tend to generate interest by inciting alarm. Bad and bloody news predominates; the exotic and strange are headlined; the titillating and shocking lead the news hour, that which generates controversy and ratings is emphasized. It’s not long before we have moved away from necessary and important news and back into the sinful curiosity that sets tongues wagging and heads shaking.

Sinful curiosity, even of this mitigated form, so easily draws us into very negative, dark, and even depressing places. News junkies would do well to balance their diet with other more edifying things than what is the latest scandal or threat.

St. Paul gives good advice to all of us when it comes to sinful curiosity and our tendency to collect unnecessary, unhelpful, and unenlightening news. In effect, he invites us to discipline our minds with the following good and solid advice:

Finally, brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things (Phil 4:8).

Curiosity—the double-edged sword—so noble yet so easily ignoble, so wonderful yet so easily debased.

Welcome Fr. Jude

A warm, warm WELCOME TO Fr. Jude Halphen, Phd of the Diocese of Lafayette and full-time director of the Office of Marriage and Family Life. Along with his current duties, Fr. Jude will also be assisting with weekend Masses here at St. Anne.

Fr. Jude was ordained in June of 1993 and has had several parochial assignments, the most recent of which was St. Peter’s in New Iberia where he generously served for 14 ½ years.   He and Fr. Mouton were together in College Seminary at St. Ben’s in Covington and

then later in Graduate School at Mt. St. Mary’s in Emmitsburg, Maryland.  Fr. Jude is from Opelousas and has one brother, James.

Our Beautification Projects

If you haven't noticed our cemetery fence lately, take a look!!!  Our plaques In Memory of self or a loved one are finally in and have been placed.  (You can still purchase a section of our fence for $700)  Also, the East side of our church looks so nice with the plants along side the church as well as the new trees that dress the side walk heading into our cemetery.  The new tombs are complete and are currently available.  Singles sell for $3,100 and doubles $4,100 which includes the plot, vault, skirting, and opening/closing.  The new tombs are located behind the first cross in the old section of our cemetery and near our fence line.  For more information, call our office.  See all of these pictures in the slideshow below.

Greetings

From Our Pastor

Welcome, Bienvenue, Bienvenido, Chào Mừng!

 

My dear friends,

St. Anne Roman Catholic Church was established in 1859 under pontificate of Pope Pius IX, Archbishop Anthony Blanc of New Orleans and Fr. Etienne Jules Foltier, our first pastor.

We are a thriving community (1,900+ families) located in Youngsville, Louisiana about 10 miles south of Lafayette and having neighboring church parishes of Sacred Heart of Jesus in Broussard and St. Joseph in Milton.

Our stated mission is:  Inspired by our ancestral heritage, we the Roman Catholic Community of St. Anne, commit ourselves: to God oriented living, empowering Catholic Evangelization, to reaching to all people – active, inactive and non-Catholics, and respecting life from conception to natural death.  We pray that our faith continue to strengthen from generation to generation, through the intercession of St. Anne.  This is our mission!  This is our challenge!

There are many ministries that one can avail oneself of as our revamped website attests too; please consider giving your gifts of time, talent and treasure.

We appreciate you, love you, and will do all we can to aide you in your spiritual journey to the house of our Father.

Please join us for Sunday Mass as we experience the Table of God's Word and Eucharist.

In Christ,

Rev. Jason Mouton

Pastor

Standing Faithful

Have you had a chance to check out our Parishioner Joan Broussard's blog, Standing Faithful?  If not, you should.  Enjoy uplifting and spirit lead writings.

To check out the blog, Click here

PARISH PASTORAL COUNCIL VACANCIES

Parish Council Nominations

Nominations are STILL being accepted for ten (10) positions on the Parish Pastoral Council. Two positions will be appointed by the pastor. Each council position is for a three year term. St. Anne Church Parish Council Elections will be held after we have enough nominees.

 

QUALIFICATIONS FOR PARISH COUNCIL MEMBERSHIP.

1. Age – 18 or over and a Confirmed Catholic.

2. Active, registered member of the parish for at least one year.

3. Desire to serve the Church

4. Commitment  to attend the scheduled meetings/workshops for formation in ministry

5. Willingness to devote considerable time and effort to meetings and commission work

6. Desire to unify and reconcile the parish and the community

7. Read and agree to abide by the Parish Council Constitution

 

If you wish to nominate someone or are interested in serving on the council, please fill in the forms below and place them in the collection baskets at Mass or mail them to the office.

Current Council Members are: Mary Ellen Bagget, Jeanette Broussard, Joan Broussard, Tina DeLeon, Edward LaFleur, Stephanie Thibeaux, Jon Burley

ALL MEMBERS ARE OUTGOING, BUT CAN BE NOMINATED AGAIN.

 

St. Anne Catholic Church

2013 Parish Council Nomination

 

NAME _________________________________

 

ADDRESS ______________________________

 

CITY, STATE ___________________________

 

PHONE ________________________________

 

DATE OF BIRTH ________________________

 

Please verify with the person to be nominated that he/she would like to serve on the council. All members must be 18 years of age, a registered parishioner of St. Anne Catholic Church  for one year, and must read and agree to abide by the Parish Council Constitution.

 

 

NEW ITEMS!!!!!

We hope you enjoy our new website!  Please take the time to search our site and check back often for updates.  Some of our new features are: Online Giving, Facebook, Parish Calendar, Daily Scripture Reading and more!

Make St. Anne Your Home

Catholics Come Home, Inc. is an independent non-profit Catholic apostolate that creates effective and compassionate media messages and broadcasts them nationally and internationally, in order to inspire, educate and evangelize inactive Catholics and others, and invite them to live a deeper faith in Jesus Christ, in accord with the magisterium of the Roman Catholic Church. Visit the website at http://www.catholicscomehome.org.

DAILY SCRIPTURE READING

  • First Reading - Jer 2: 1-3, 7-8, 12-13
    1 And the word of the Lord came to me, saying: 2 Go, and cry in the ears of Jerusalem, saying: Thus saith the Lord: I have remembered thee, pitying thy soul, pitying thy youth, and the love of thy espousals, when thou followedst me in the desert, in a...

SAINT OF THE DAY

  • St. Sharbel Makhluf
    Although this saint never traveled far from the Lebanese village of Beka-Kafra, where he was born, his influence has spread widely.

    Joseph Zaroun Makluf was raised by an uncle because his father, a mule driver, died when Joseph was only three. At the age of 23, Joseph joined the Monastery...